Telephone System Call Routing

Info

Level: Beginner
Presenter: Eli the Computer Guy
Date Created: August 8, 2010
Length of Class: 60 Minutes
Tracks

Telephone Systems
Prerequisites

Introduction to Telephone Systems
Purpose of Class

This class discusses how calls get routed within a telephone system PBX.
Topics Covered

Extensions
Call Paths
Out Calling
Incoming Trunk Groups
Auto Attendants
Hunt Groups
Call Groups
Out Going Call Routing
Class Notes

Introduction
All telephone systems use the same basic concepts to route calls
Extensions
PBX’s relate to everything as an extension. A station is an extension. An Auto Attendant is an extension, etc.
You should create a range of extensions for use for stations and subscribers, and a different range of extensions to be used for administrative purposes (Auto Attendants, Hunt Groups, etc)
You can determine how many numbers make up an extension (2,3,4)
Call Paths
Call paths determine how an incoming call is routed.
A standard call path states that a station is rung 3 times, and then the call is routed to voicemail.
You can have call paths with 20+ steps.
Out Calling
Out calling allows the PBX to route calls from the outside to outside lines. A call from the outside can be routed to a cell phone.
Out calling requires 2 trunk lines (1 for the incoming call, and one for the outgoing call)
Out calling can be a HUGE security problem if not administered properly.
Incoming Trunks
Incoming trunk lines are programmed into Trunk Groups.
Individual Trunk Groups are pointed at a specific extension for incoming calls (Usually an Auto Attendant)
Multiple businesses in the same building can use the same PBX by putting their phone lines into Trunk Groups and then pointing the Trunk Group to their Auto Attendant.
Auto Attendants
“If you would like Sales press 1”
The message for the Auto Attendant resides on the Voicemail System.
You create an Extension, make it an Auto Attendant, point the message to a Voicemail box, determine what will happen when users press number keys, determine what happens if the user does nothing.
Hunt Groups
Are Extensions that when called ring a series of other extensions in order.
If the first extension in the hunt Group is busy, the next extension in the Hunt Group is rung.
Weighted or Smart Hunt Groups can route calls to extensions based on programmed parameters.
Call Groups
Call Groups are Extensions where numerous Extensions are rung at the same time when the Extension is dialed.
Outgoing Call Routing
You can create Outgoing Trunk Groups based on whether the trunk lines have local, long distance, or international calling privileges.
You can create codes to allow managers to be able to access any Outgoing Trunk Group.
Outgoing Call Routing is based on the number of digits dialed, and whether those digits match a pattern that allows the call to be routed to a specific Outgoing Trunk Group.

Introduction to Telephone Systems

Introduction to Telephone Systems

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Info

Level: Beginner
Presenter: Eli the Computer Guy
Date Created: August 2, 2010
Length of Class: 54 Minutes
Tracks

Telephone Systems
Prerequisites

None
Purpose of Class

This class introduces students to the basic components of telephone systems.
Topics Covered

Public Switched Telephone Network
Central Offices
Trunk Lines
PBX and Voicemail Systems
PBX Stations
Voicemail Subcribers
Class Notes

Introduction
Telephone systems are not complicated if you understand how they work.
A Word on VoIP
VoIP is not a telephone system
PSTN
PSTN — Public Switched Telephone Network is like the Internet, but for telephone communication
NADP — North American Dialing Plan — Is the system for routing telephone calls.
Central Office — All telephone lines connect to a local central office
Trunk Lines
Every Trunk Line has a telephone number
A Trunk Line allows for 1 incoming or outgoing call. You can have far more telephones in a building then you have trunk lines.
Incoming Trunk lines are setup in Hunt Groups. If the main phone number is busy the call is automatically forwarded to the next number in the Hunt Group
Incoming Hunt Groups are setup by your local telephone company.
Outgoing calls can be routed to use selected trunk lines. This in configured in your PBX.
PBX and Voicemail
The PBX routes telephone calls
The Voicemail system provides all audio messaging. (Voicemail boxes, Message Boards, and Auto Attendant Messages)
Stations
All devices that connect to the PBX are “Stations”. This includes telephones, call boxes, intercom systems, etc.
There are 2 types of stations; Analogue and Digital.
Analogue and Digital stations have to be connected to appropriate ports on the PBX. An analogue phone cannot connect to a digital port and vice versa.
Almost all fax machines and phones you buy at retail stores are analogue. If your new fax machine does not work it may be because it’s plugged into a digital line.
Subscribers
Subscribers are users of the Voicemail system.
Subscribers do not have to have stations
Voicemail ports are the number of connections to the Voicemail system at any one time. This includes not just people retrieving their voicemail, but also incoming calls that connect to Auto Attendant messages.
Final Thoughts
Be careful before you touch! Most older telephone and voicemail systems were administered using a phone keypad, NOT and computer interface. If you mess something up it can be very difficult to rebuild a deleted Auto Attendant or such.
Resources

North American Numbering Plan
PSTN — Wikipedia